• Hunting for microbes since 2003

  • We seek to understand

    the role of microorganisms in Earth's nutrient cycles

    and as symbionts of other organisms

  • Cycling of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur

    affect the health of our planet

  • The human microbiome -

    Our own social network of microbial friends

  • Ancient invaders -

    Bacterial symbionts of amoebae

    and the evolution of the intracellular lifestyle

  • Marine symbioses:

    Listening in on conversations

    between animals and the microbes they can't live without

  • Single cell techniques offer new insights

    into the ecology of microbes

  • Apply for the DOME International PhD/PostDoc program

Dome News

Latest publications

The Signal and the Noise: Characteristics of Antisense RNA in Complex Microbial Communities

High-throughput sequencing has allowed unprecedented insight into the composition and function of complex microbial communities. With metatran- scriptomics, it is possible to interrogate the transcriptomes of multiple organisms si- multaneously to get an overview of the gene expression of the entire community. Studies have successfully used metatranscriptomics to identify and describe rela- tionships between gene expression levels and community characteristics. How- ever, metatranscriptomic data sets contain a rich suite of additional information that is just beginning to be explored. Here, we focus on antisense expression in meta- transcriptomics, discuss the different computational strategies for handling it, and highlight the strengths but also potentially detrimental effects on downstream anal- ysis and interpretation. We also analyzed the antisense transcriptomes of multiple genomes and metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) from five different data sets and found high variability in the levels of antisense transcription for individual spe- cies, which were consistent across samples. Importantly, we challenged the concep- tual framework that antisense transcription is primarily the product of transcriptional noise and found mixed support, suggesting that the total observed antisense RNA in complex communities arises from the combined effect of unknown biological and technical factors. Antisense transcription can be highly informative, including techni- cal details about data quality and novel insight into the biology of complex micro- bial communities.

Michaelsen TY, Brandt J, Singleton CM, Kirkegaard RH, Wiesinger J, Segata N, Albertsen M
2020 - mSystems, 5: e00587-19

One complete and seven draft genome sequences of subdivision 1 and 3 Acidobacteria from soil

We report eight genomes from representatives of the phylum Acidobacteriasubdivisions 1 and 3, isolated from soils. The genome sizes range from 4.9 to 6.7 Mb. Genomic analysis reveals putative genes for low- and high-affinity respiratory oxygen reductases, high-affinity hydrogenases, and the capacity to use a diverse collection of carbohydrates.

Eichorst SA, Trojan D, Huntemann M, Clum A, Pillay M, Palaniappan K, Varghese N, Mikhailova N, Stamatis D, Reddy TBK, Daum C, Goodwin LA, Shapiro N, Ivanova N, Kyrpides N, Woyke T, Woebken D
2020 - Microbiology Resource Announcements, 9: 1-4

Thinking outside the Chlamydia box

Chlamydiae have long been studied exclusively in the context of disease. Yet, accumulating evidence over nearly three decades shows that chlamydiae are ubiquitous in the environment, thriving as symbionts of unicellular eukaryotes such as amoeba and infecting a broad range of animal hosts. These chlamydiae share the characteristic chlamydial developmental cycle and other chlamydial hallmarks. Their discovery fundamentally changed our perspective on chlamydial diversity. Instead of a single genus, Chlamydia, including closely related pathogens, the chlamydiae comprise hundreds of families and genera. Investigating isolates and non-cultured representatives provided insights into features that are in common with or divergent from known Chlamydia species, and suggested that some of these chlamydiae may also be considered pathogens. Importantly, these studies have contributed to a better understanding of the biology of all chlamydiae, and they provide a framework for investigating the evolution of the chlamydial intracellular lifestyle and pathogenicity.

A Taylor-Brown, T Halter, A Polkinghorne, M Horn
2020 - 429-458. in Chlamydia Biology. (M Tan, JH Hegemann, C Sütterlin). Caister Academic Press

Lecture series

Water in, microbes out: Water in buildings as a model system to study microbial ecology

Fangqiong Ling
McKelvey School of Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
12.03.2020
12:00 h
Lecture Hall 2, UZA1, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien

The early evolution of elemental sulfur reduction

Stephen Mojzsis
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
07.05.2020
12:00 h
Lecture Hall 2, UZA1, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien