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    from summer 2021.

  • Hunting for microbes since 2003

  • We seek to understand

    the role of microorganisms in Earth's nutrient cycles

    and as symbionts of other organisms

  • Cycling of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur

    affect the health of our planet

  • The human microbiome -

    Our own social network of microbial friends

  • Ancient invaders -

    Bacterial symbionts of amoebae

    and the evolution of the intracellular lifestyle

  • Marine symbioses:

    Listening in on conversations

    between animals and the microbes they can't live without

  • Single cell techniques offer new insights

    into the ecology of microbes

  • Microbial Symbioses

    University of Vienna PhD program

  • Apply for the DOME International PhD/PostDoc program

Dome News

Latest publications

Electrochemical enrichment of marine denitrifying bacteria to enhance nitrate metabolization in seawater

High concentrations of nitrate from industrial discharges to coastal marine environments are a matter of concern owing to their ecological consequences. In the last years, Bioelectrochemical Denitrification Systems (BEDS) have emerged as a promising nitrate removal technology. However, they still have limitations, such as the enrichment strategy for specific microbial communities in the electrodes under natural conditions. In this study, three-electrode electrochemical cells were used to test microbial enrichment from natural seawater by applying three reported potentials associated with the dissimilatory denitrification process (-130, -260, and -570 mV vs. Ag/AgCl). The microbial community analysis showed that by applying -260 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) to the working electrode, it was possible to significantly enrich denitrifying microorganisms, specifically Marinobacter, in comparison with the control. Furthermore, -260 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) led to a significantly higher nitrate removal than other conditions, which, combined with cyclic voltammetry analysis, suggested that the polarized electrodes worked as external electron donors for nitrate reduction. Hence, this work demonstrates for the first time that it is possible to enrich marine denitrifying microorganisms by applying an overpotential of -260 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) without the need for a culture medium, the addition of an exogenous electron donor (i.e., organic matter) or a previously enriched inoculum.

De La Fuente MJ, de la Iglesia R, Farías L, Daims H, Lukumbuzya M, Vargas I
2021 - J Environ Chem Eng, in press

An economical and flexible dual barcoding, two-step PCR approach for highly multiplexed amplicon sequencing

In microbiome research, phylogenetic and functional marker gene amplicon sequencing is the most commonly-used community profiling approach. Consequently, a plethora of protocols for the preparation and multiplexing of samples for amplicon sequencing have been developed. Here, we present two economical high-throughput gene amplification and sequencing workflows that are implemented as standard operating procedures at the Joint Microbiome Facility of the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Vienna. These workflows are based on a previously-published two-step PCR approach, but have been updated to either increase the accuracy of results, or alternatively to achieve orders of magnitude higher numbers of samples to be multiplexed in a single sequencing run. The high-accuracy workflow relies on unique dual sample barcoding. It allows the same level of sample multiplexing as the previously-published two-step PCR approach, but effectively eliminates residual read missasignments between samples (crosstalk) which are inherent to single barcoding approaches. The high-multiplexing workflow is based on combinatorial dual sample barcoding, which theoretically allows for multiplexing up to 299,756 amplicon libraries of the same target gene in a single massively-parallelized amplicon sequencing run. Both workflows presented here are highly economical, easy to implement, and can, without significant modifications or cost, be applied to any target gene of interest.

Pjevac P, Hausmann B, Schwarz J, Kohl G, Herbold CW, Loy A, Berry D
2021 - Front Microbiol, In press

Sulfoquinovose is a select nutrient of prominent bacteria and a source of hydrogen sulfide in the human gut.

Responses of the microbiota to diet are highly personalized but mechanistically not well understood because many metabolic capabilities and interactions of human gut microorganisms are unknown. Here we show that sulfoquinovose (SQ), a sulfonated monosaccharide omnipresent in green vegetables, is a selective yet relevant substrate for few but ubiquitous bacteria in the human gut. In human feces and in defined co-culture, Eubacterium rectale and Bilophila wadsworthia used recently identified pathways to cooperatively catabolize SQ with 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate as a transient intermediate to hydrogen sulfide (HS), a key intestinal metabolite with disparate effects on host health. SQ-degradation capability is encoded in almost half of E. rectale genomes but otherwise sparsely distributed among microbial species in the human intestine. However, re-analysis of fecal metatranscriptome datasets of four human cohorts showed that SQ degradation (mostly from E. rectale and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii) and HS production (mostly from B. wadsworthia) pathways were expressed abundantly across various health states, demonstrating that these microbial functions are core attributes of the human gut. The discovery of green-diet-derived SQ as an exclusive microbial nutrient and an additional source of HS in the human gut highlights the role of individual dietary compounds and organosulfur metabolism on microbial activity and has implications for precision editing of the gut microbiota by dietary and prebiotic interventions.

Hanson BT, Kits KD, Löffler J, Burrichter AG, Fiedler A, Denger K, Frommeyer B, Herbold CW, Rattei T, Karcher N, Segata N, Schleheck D, Loy A
2021 - ISME J, In press

Lecture series

Making chemistry visible in complex biological systems

Klaus Koren
Aarhus University, Demark
22.04.2021
12:00 h
Webinar

Exploring viral diversity from the global oceans to the human gut

Ann Gregory
KU Leuven, Belgium
15.04.2021
12:00 h
Webinar